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Another End of the World is Possible

by John Halstead

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  • What Unitarians Taught Me About Anarchism (Anarchism for Civilians series)
    We tend to reject hierarchy instinctually in some parts of our lives, while accepting it uncritically in others. Anarchists strive to eliminate all hierarchy, in every aspect of life.
  • “Befriending Our Despair” by Joanna Macy
    Because we have the courage to speak of our despair, the world becomes more vivid. Precisely because we speak it, we don’t stay there. Because that despair is the covering of our love for our world. And we crack it open, by speaking it, so the love can act.
  • Why I am not a “Doomer”
    I’m not going to try to tell you where to focus your energy. But I will say this, if your choice is being motivated by a fear of despair, if you are fighting down a feeling of hopelessness, consider letting yourself feel it. Really feel it. Trust that there is wisdom in all of our feelings, even the dark ones, maybe especially the dark ones. And see where it takes you.

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“What will it take for human beings to change? I think, maybe, it would take dying. Maybe the only way we could experience a conversion to a biocentric way of life is if we believed—if we really knew—that we were going to die. ‘We will not save what we do not love,’ wrote the ecotheologian, Thomas Berry. Maybe radical love is only possible when we give up hope for ourselves.”

From the Back Cover

In these essays, author and activist, John Halstead, takes us from a 2016 environmental protest at a Midwestern tar sands refinery to a mid-20th century Mexican cornfield stricken with blight to a bloody sacrifice to the Mother Goddess in ancient Rome, and from ancient pagan myths to the latest superhero movies to speculative fiction about a biocentric com­munity of the future. In so doing, he explores the intersection of climate change and capitalism, hope and despair, death and denial, hubris and hero myths, love and limitations, popular culture and storytelling, and what it would really mean for our relationship with the natural world if we were to admit that we are doomed.

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What If It’s Already Too Late

I had a terrible thought recently … “What if it’s already too late?”

Die Early and Often

We are doomed to walk the path of the Dying God.

The Yoga of Despair

What will it take for human beings to change? I think, maybe, it would take dying.

About

John Halstead

John Halstead is the author of Another End of the World is Possible, in which he explores what it would really mean for our relationship with the natural world if we were to admit that we are doomed. John is a native of the southern Laurentian bioregion and lives in Northwest Indiana, near Chicago. He is a co-founder of 350 Indiana-Calumet, which worked to organize resistance to the fossil fuel industry in the Region. John currently facilitates climate grief support groups. He was the principal facilitator of “A Pagan Community Statement on the Environment.” John strives to live up to the challenge posed by the Statement through his writing and activism. He has written for numerous online platforms, including Patheos, Huffington Post, PrayWithYourFeet.org, and Gods & Radicals. John also facilitates climate grief support groups affiliated with the Good Grief Network.

John’s Interview on Last Born in the Wilderness

Quotes

“There is no reason for amazement: surely one always knew that cultures decay, and life’s end is death.”

Robinson Jeffers

“When our day is come for the victory of death, death closes in; there is nothing we can do, except be crucified–and resurrected; dismembered totally, and then reborn.”

Joseph Campbell

“The end of the human race will be that it will eventually die of civilization.”

Emerson

“It’s only in recognizing the fact that our lives are limited, complicit, imperfect, and interdependent that we begin to understand what it means to live together in this world.”

Roy Scranton

A Farewell Note

from Professor Brendan Mackey
Director Of Griffith Climate Change Response Program
Griffith University